Wednesday, August 29, 2007

FINALLY! Curly Willow Tips and Kuwa




After a long hiatus, the Curly Willow Tips and Natural Kuwa will be back in stock the first week of September. The Curly Willow Tips are stripped of their bark, and are easily shaped after a few hours of soaking, giving you total control over their final form.

The Kuwa is the most contorted branch we have available, and is strong enough to support hanging votives or other items of a similar weight.

17 comments:

Anonymous said...

I came upon your site when I was doing a google search for branches. I am thinking of tackling the incredible feat of doing my own centerpieces for my wedding next fall and I have always wanted something with tall branches that can supporting hanging candles and some other things mixed in like flowers or other branches. We are trying to keep the $$ down since we are paying for everything ourselves (thus, as few flowers as possible! lol). I'm going to bookmark your site though! :)

Justin said...

Congratulations! For hanging candles or other objects while keeping the price down, your best bets are Corkscrew Willow, Kuwa or Mitsumata. These range from 12.50 to !4.50 per bundle.

The pricier option is Manzanita, but these get expensive once you get above two feet.

Rachel said...

I also stumbled across this website through google when trying to find a flower alternative for my wedding centerpieces. I am a little nervous about the idea of tackling this on my own but your website gives very clear pictures of the branches. Just wondering, how long do the manzanita, corkscrew willow, kuwa, or mitsumata last? (ie how far in advance of the wedding should I order?) And also, would you make a sample package so I could experiment with some different branches in advance?
to the first poster, let me know if you have made any strides in your centerpiece planning. As for me, I just found these great hanging votives: http://www.flowersandsupplies.com/Hanging-Votive-Holders_p_0-28.html

Justin said...

Hi, Don't worry - plenty of people have tackled their own wedding decorations with great success! The Manzanita, Corkscrew Willow, Kuwa and Mitsumata all last indefinitely as long as they are kept dry (keep them out of that wet corner of your basement or garage!), so you can order whenever you like. The one catch is that we occasionally have supply shortages. You certainly should try a few bundles to experiment with before you make a decision - send an email to service@nettletonhollow.com for more info.

Anonymous said...

I am doing my wedding centerpieces and would like to know do I just soak the curly willow in the bath tub with just plain water? Or do I mist them? How wet do I get them? I am also hanging votives from them but I am using the battery powered ones from Michaels craft stores, with their weekly 40% off in the newspaper they are 1.50 each, we will wire them to the branches to hang.
December Bride :o)

Justin said...

To shape the Curly Willow, you should soak them in the bathtub for a few hours or so. Once they're flexible, shape away! They should be completely dry in 24 hours. The branches may be a little too delicate for hanging votives, although it sounds like you have your eye on some light ones that may work. If not, you may want to consider the Corkscrew Willow, Kuwa or Mitsumata.

Anonymous said...

Don't be afraid of doing your own wedding decorations -- they'll turn out WAY more interesting and personal that way. For my outdoor/garden wedding, I used red manzanita branches and put a couple small birds on each one -- very natural and totally simple. Everyone loved them, and everyone wanted to take them home, so all I'm left with of the centerpieces are pictures!

supriya said...

I have a ceramic vase with a broad base but very narrow mouth (about 1" diameter), and I think shaped curly willow would look great in it, and balance out the shape of the vase. How many branches would fit in such a vase? Also I'd like to paint the branches after shaping them... what sort of paint should i use?

Justin said...

For a vase with that small of a mouth, you'd probably only be able to fit a third of a bundle into it. Because of the wide base and narrow mouth, the branches will likely spread out a lot, producing an hourglass shaped display - I'd say that shaping probably wouldn't be necessary! As for painting them, spray paint would be the simplest. - Justin

Anonymous said...

If I want to spray paint the curly willow copper, fto match the motiff of the wedding, can I do so after I've shaped them and once they have dried? What kind of paint do I use? Does it have to be floral paint or is the Design Master brand ok not necessarily for flowers/ plants?

Justin said...

Indeed, you can paint the branches after you shape the branches and they have dried (you definitely don't want to do it before though!). Any paint should work fine. - Justin

Anonymous said...

Do the branches really come out as pale/light in person? I'd rather they were darker/more rustic, but don't really want to paint them (I do want them to look natural). thanks!

Justin said...

Yes indeed, they are quite light in person (a blonde color) due to the fact that they've been stripped of their bark. The Twisted Willow - http://www.nettletonhollow.com/twisted-willow-branches.html - is a great choice for a more natural look.

Anonymous said...

are the fresh curly willow darker/more natural looking? I sort of like the more 'wild' look of the curly willow. thanks!

Justin said...

The Fresh Curly Willow definitely is darker and wilder looking - http://www.nettletonhollow.com/curly-willow-branches-fresh.html - it's available now, but we'll be out of it in about a month or so. Get it while you can!

Anonymous said...

I am interested in using the Kuwa branches since they are thicker and can hold votives. However, I wanted to know can they be shaped the same way the curly willow can be? I want them to rest a certain way in a tall wide vase and wondered if I can shape them even more than they already are.

Justin said...

The Kuwa can't be soaked and shaped - you might want to consider using the Mitsumata instead.